All Articles: Cases

Can a British Overseas Citizen be stateless?

In Teh v Secretary of State for the Home Department [2018] EWHC 1586 (Admin) the High Court has found that a British Overseas Citizen (BOC) can be stateless under the Immigration Rules if he or she has no other nationality. This is an interesting and ...

6th July 2018 By

New country guidance case on Kurds returned to Iraq

AAH (Iraqi Kurds – internal relocation) (CG) [2018] UKUT 212 (IAC) is a recent country guidance case on the availability of internal relocation for Iraqi Kurds to the Iraqi Kurdish Region. This case updates some of the guidance contained in AA ( ...

2nd July 2018 By

Long delays in Home Office provision of immigration bail accommodation are lawful

Where a detainee is held under immigration powers by the state, he or she has the right to apply to be released on bail to the First-tier Tribunal. Previously, if a detainee had no place to stay on release then they could ask to be accommodated, under ...

29th June 2018 By

Tribunal decides on Immigration Rules for overseas adoptions, rescues “feral” child

The case of TY (Overseas Adoptions – Certificates of Eligibility) Jamaica [2018] UKUT 197 (IAC) involves the complex interplay between the Immigration Rules and international adoption law. It is a must-read for anyone involved in applications or ...

28th June 2018 By

The meaning of “residence” for indefinite leave to remain applications

In the case of R (Nesiama & Ors) v Secretary of State for the Home Department [2018] EWCA Civ 1369, the Court of Appeal found that “residence” in the UK means “physical presence”, such that continuous residence in an application for indefi ...

27th June 2018 By

Data protection damages for Iranian asylum seekers confirmed

What should the repercussions be if the Home Office accidentally splashes the personal details of asylum seekers all over the internet? If your answer is “compensation”, congratulations: you are at one with the Court of Appeal. The case is ...

27th June 2018 By

Tribunal belatedly ends Home Office exemption from judicial review time “rules”

Since 2014 the Upper Tribunal has permitted the Home Office double the normal time limit set by the procedure “rules” for responding to an application for judicial review. Instead of having the 21 days proscribed by the “rules” ...

25th June 2018 By

Court of Appeal explains protection duty after Home Office loses trafficked child

In R (TDT, by his litigation friend Tara Topteagarden) v Secretary of State for the Home Department [2018] EWCA Civ 1395 the Court of Appeal considered the threshold at which the duty to protect trafficked persons under article 4 of the European Conve ...

20th June 2018 By

Out-of-country appeals for EU citizens: the effect of Kiarie and Byndloss

In the case of R (Wandzel) v Secretary of State for the Home Department (Rev 1) [2018] EWHC 1371 (Admin), Nigel Poole QC, sitting as a deputy High Court judge, had to deal with the effect of the famous case of Kiarie and Byndloss (discussed on Free M ...

15th June 2018 By

Residence rights for divorced non-EU citizens improve as Home Secretary concedes appeal

Baigazieva v Secretary of State for the Home Department [2018] EWCA Civ 1088 is about what happens to a non-EEA citizen spouse if they divorce their EEA citizen partner. Article 13(2) of the Citizens Rights Directive 2004 lays down a set of criteria o ...

14th June 2018 By

Council criticised for failure to provide accommodation to child refugees

Most unaccompanied child asylum seekers and refugees will be “children in need” for the purposes of the Children Act 1989. So the issue of whether or not local authorities have properly exercised their duties to provide accommodation and care freq ...

13th June 2018 By

When law and politics collide: Brexit in the Court of Session

The Court of Session has refused to make a reference to the Court of Justice of the European Union in Luxembourg to determine whether the UK’s notice that it is leaving the EU under Article 50 can be cancelled. Given that the subject matter inv ...

11th June 2018 By

Rwandan bishop allegedly involved in genocide wins second settlement appeal

A Church of England bishop accused of committing crimes against humanity during the Rwandan genocide has won an appeal by the Home Office challenging his right to settle in the UK. The case is Secretary of State for the Home Department v Ruhumuliza [ ...

7th June 2018 By

Same-sex spouses should benefit from free movement rights, says CJEU

Today marked a big step in the advancement of the rights of same-sex couples. Following a reference made to the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) by the Romanian Constitutional Court, the CJEU has ruled that “spouses” in Directive ...

5th June 2018 By

No costs awarded despite “clearly unfounded” certification being withdrawn

In ZN (Afghanistan) and KA (Iraq) [2018] EWCA Civ 1059, the Court of Appeal considered the tricky issue of costs in public law cases, in a scenario where the appeals were withdrawn following consent orders. The main points The judgment is interesting ...

4th June 2018 By

Satisfying the Immigration Rules enough for Article 8 success

The test for an Article 8 claim to stay in the UK within the Immigration Rules is whether there are “insurmountable obstacles” to continuing family life outside the UK. But even if an applicant does pass this test, there is a further hurdl ...

1st June 2018 By

Jumping the gun in Dublin III cases

Today the Court of Justice of the European Union handed down a decision in the case of C-647/16 Adil Hassan v Prefet du Pas-de-Calais concerning the Dublin III Regulation. The press summary is here. Practitioners will be well aware how intricate and ...

31st May 2018 By

Strasbourg gets strict with non-exhaustion of domestic remedies

The European Court of Human Rights took a strict approach to non-exhaustion of domestic remedies in the case of Khaksar v United Kingdom (application no. 2654/18), decided last month. The message to potential applicants is clear: all domestic remedie ...

29th May 2018 By

Tribunal opens door to awards of costs against Home Office for unreasonable behaviour

A heavyweight Presidential panel sitting in the First-tier Tribunal has made multiple awards of costs against the Home Office for unreasonable behaviour and given guidance on the proper approach to making such awards in future. Despite the decision be ...

23rd May 2018 By

Court of Justice to decide whether self-employed women have Saint Prix maternity rights

In Her Majesty’s Revenue and Customs v HD (CHB) (Second interim decision) [2018] UKUT 148 (AAC), the Upper Tribunal decided to make a reference to the Court of Justice of the European Union. The question is whether an EU national who was self-e ...

22nd May 2018 By

Asylum can be refused for general promotion of terrorism

The Court of Appeal in Youssef v Secretary of State for the Home Department [2018] EWCA Civ 933 decided that the appellant was disqualified from refugee status because he had incited terrorist acts in general. There was no requirement for there to ...

17th May 2018 By

Court of Appeal weighs in on “persistent offenders”

The Court of Appeal in SC (Zimbabwe) v SSHD [2018] EWCA Civ 929 gives us yet another new decision on the deportation of foreign criminals, this time on the definition of “persistent offenders”. Its discussion of the concept, while inter ...

17th May 2018 By

Where’s the beef? Court criticises quality of Article 8 applications

The Court of Appeal’s decision in Parveen v Secretary of State for the Home Department [2018] EWCA Civ 932 seems to be an additional nail in the coffin for the once renowned (and now shut down) Malik Law Chambers, with the court repeatedly criticisi ...

16th May 2018 By

High Court remedy for woman embroiled in disputed citizenship claim

Before she travelled to the land of her fathers, Yasmeen Din was born to Pakistani parents in the Churchill Hospital in Oxford on 26 June 1968. By virtue of section 11(1) of the British Nationality Act 1981, read with section 4 of the British National ...

14th May 2018 By

Entry bans don’t preclude residence card applications, says Court of Justice

Fresh out of the Court of Justice of the European Union is the interesting case of C-82/16 K.A. & Others v Belgium. A significant part of the decision deals with the 2008 Returns Directive, which does not apply to the UK. The remainder of the co ...

11th May 2018 By

The limits of consent orders: agreement to consider something irrelevant has no effect

Ararso v Secretary of State for the Home Department [2018] EWCA Civ 845 is an unusual appeal about the extent to which the Home Office must take account of orders made in previous judicial review proceedings when deciding to re-detain someone. The Cou ...

10th May 2018 By

The public interest in deporting criminals: a triple threat

The Court of Appeal in DW (Jamaica) v Secretary of State for the Home Department [2018] EWCA Civ 797 has stepped in to overturn the First-tier Tribunal’s decision to block the deportation of an individual on the basis of his family life. Factual ba ...

3rd May 2018 By

Carriers’ liability: Ryanair challenges the Secretary of State – and loses

In Ryanair v Secretary of State for the Home Department [2018] EWCA Civ 899 the budget airline, no stranger to litigation, challenged the imposition of a £2,000 fine on it for carrying a man from Germany to the UK who, said the Secretary of State, ha ...

1st May 2018 By

Subsidiary protection for people intentionally deprived of healthcare

In the case of C-353/16 MP v Secretary of State for the Home Department, decided yesterday, the Court of Justice of the European Union has found that A person who has in the past been tortured in his country of origin is eligible for ‘subsidiary pro ...

25th April 2018 By