The importance of keeping the Home Office up to date

What happens when someone doesn’t receive a decision sent to them by the Home Office that affects their right to continue living in the UK? The answer to this question depends on what attempts were made to send the decision to the person and whe ...

12th November 2019 By

Court of Appeal cheatsheet on human rights in immigration cases

In GM (Sri Lanka) v Secretary of State for the Home Department [2019] EWCA Civ 1630, handed down on Friday, the Court of Appeal provides a helpful summary of where we currently stand with private and family life cases under Article 8 of the European C ...

8th October 2019 By

Briefing: the status of EU immigration and asylum law after Brexit

As the Brexit crisis trundles on, and we edge closer to the deadline of 31 October 2019, many are trying to pin down what happens to EU immigration and asylum law after the UK leaves the EU (or, to use the Prime Minister’s words, after we puncture & ...

30th September 2019 By

Home Office gets extra time to acknowledge service of judicial reviews

In immigration law, deadlines are important. They also frequently cause confusion. Sound familiar? That may be because this is how I began a post last month following the Upper Tribunal case of Bhavsar. The Upper Tribunal has now published another cas ...

19th July 2019 By

MPs publish damning indictment of UK visa process for African visitors

A cross-party group of MPs has published a highly critical report on the Home Office’s treatment of visit visa applicants from Africa. It forms part of an ongoing inquiry into the high level of visa refusals for Africans seeking to visit the UK for ...

16th July 2019 By

Tribunal blows hole in mandatory application process for EU law residence documents

In 2016 the Home Office embarked on an attempt to homogenise the application processes for immigration applications made under EU law and those made under UK law. The Upper Tribunal has confirmed in Rehman (EEA Regulations 2016 – specified evidence) ...

11th July 2019 By

Upper Tribunal sets new procedure for missed appeal deadlines

In immigration law, deadlines are important. They also frequently cause confusion. Bhavsar (late application for PTA: procedure) [2019] UKUT 196 (IAC) is an example of the complications that missing a deadline can cause. In Bhavsar the Upper Tribunal ...

28th June 2019 By

A concrete example of how to meet the “very compelling circumstances” deportation test

The Court of Appeal has upheld the appeal against deportation of a man sentenced to five years’ imprisonment, in the process providing a good example of the kind of human rights arguments that will sway judges in this notoriously difficult area ...

17th June 2019 By

Who decides when an immigration appeal ends?

When someone pursuing an appeal in the immigration tribunal decides that they no longer want the appeal to go ahead, who gets to decide when the appeal comes to an end? The person themselves, the tribunal, or the Home Office? In July 2017, Mr Justice ...

17th April 2019 By

Important new judgments on KO (Nigeria) case and removing migrants with children in the UK

The immigration tribunal has, once again, grappled with the public interest considerations which must be taken into account in all private and family life appeals against a migrant’s removal from the UK. It is now clear that, even where a child ...

15th April 2019 By

The pathway to British citizenship for European nationals in the UK

As Brexit approaches, many European nationals in the UK are turning their attention to applications for British citizenship. Citizens of other countries who have been living in the UK for five years can apply to “naturalise” as British  ...

2nd April 2019 By

No deal planning: Home Office forgets about Scotland

Depending on which pundit you speak to, a no-deal Brexit has either got more likely or less likely over the last couple of weeks. It remains the default if the UK-EU withdrawal agreement is not passed at the third time of asking, and a further extensi ...

26th March 2019 By

Extended family members: no residence card, no rights

The Upper Tribunal has held that the non-EU partner of an EU citizen cannot start accruing time towards permanent residence status until they have a residence card, pointing out the well established distinction between family members and extended fami ...

26th February 2019 By

Don’t forget about Article 8 in asylum cases

With so much focus on whether an asylum seeker has established a well founded fear of persecution in their country of origin, the question of whether their appeal falls to be allowed under Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights is often ...

19th February 2019 By

Briefing: statutory considerations in human rights appeals

Migrants who would otherwise have no legal right to remain in the UK can appeal against their removal on the basis of their human rights. Usually they rely on Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights, which protects the right to private an ...

30th January 2019 By

A member of an EU national’s household can apply for settled status

Appendix EU of the Immigration Rules was introduced at the end of August 2018 to implement the post-Brexit settled status scheme which will enable EU citizens and their family members living in the UK to remain after Brexit. When reviewing the new rul ...

21st December 2018 By

Scottish court muddies the waters following KO (Nigeria)

Regular readers of this blog will, by now, be well aware of the Supreme Court’s decision in KO (Nigeria) which determined the correct approach in immigration cases involving children who are either British or who have lived in the UK for seven years ...

17th December 2018 By

Upper Tribunal tackles the law on the parent/child relationship

In SR (subsisting parental relationship – s117B(6)) Pakistan 2018 UKUT 3345 (IAC), the Upper Tribunal examines the various pieces of law relevant to deciding whether someone who has a child in the UK should be allowed to stay here. The case is helpf ...

16th October 2018 By

Luxembourg court to be asked if the UK can cancel Brexit

Last week the Scottish Court of Session agreed to make a reference to the Court of Justice of the European Union in Luxembourg to determine whether the UK’s notice that it is leaving the EU under Article 50 can be cancelled. The case, formally kno ...

26th September 2018 By

Deal or no deal? What a cliff-edge Brexit would mean for EU citizens

With the Article 50 deadline fast approaching, there has been growing concern that the UK will leave the European Union with “no deal”. If no withdrawal agreement making provision for a transition period is reached by 29 March 2019, the UK will fa ...

30th August 2018 By

What’s going on with UK visit visas?

In short: the Home Office are frequently refusing them. This may not come as a surprise to immigration lawyers, who are all too familiar with the Home Office’s culture of disbelief, but it has come as a nasty shock to many artists, authors, and perf ...

13th August 2018 By

The ETS English language testing saga is over

The decision in Khan & Ors v Secretary of State for the Home Department [2018] EWCA Civ 1684 brings to an end the long-running ETS saga, so called after the Educational Testing Service company that discovered large-scale cheating on its Home Offic ...

25th July 2018 By

Ambiguous changes to entrepreneur visas show why the Immigration Rules need simplifying

As regular readers of this blog will be aware, the Home Office’s latest statement of changes to the Immigration Rules comes into force tomorrow (Friday 6 July 2018). Nath has summarised the various changes being introduced in a previous post. Althou ...

5th July 2018 By

When law and politics collide: Brexit in the Court of Session

The Court of Session has refused to make a reference to the Court of Justice of the European Union in Luxembourg to determine whether the UK’s notice that it is leaving the EU under Article 50 can be cancelled. Given that the subject matter inv ...

11th June 2018 By

Winning a deportation appeal: a good judge, on a good day

Just a few days ago Thomas Beamont wrote on this blog about the Court of Appeal’s decision in Mwesezi v Secretary of State for the Home Department [2018] EWCA Civ 1104 in which the court upheld a decision to deport a foreign criminal. In Secretary ...

6th June 2018 By

The consequences of “inadvertently misleading” the Home Secretary

On 29 April the Home Secretary, Amber Rudd, resigned after admitting that she had “inadvertently misled the Home Affairs Select Committee over targets for removal of illegal immigrants” from the UK. A few days previously she had told the comm ...

1st May 2018 By

High Court’s denunciation of immigration lawyers will have a chilling effect

A lawyer is not merely a conduit through which their client’s grievances can be aired in court. The grievance must be formulated into a coherent and stateable case and presented in a professional, honest, and courteous manner. The Solicitors Regulat ...

27th April 2018 By

Court of Session case on blocking Brexit goes to full hearing

Campaigners seeking to confirm whether the UK’s Article 50 notification triggering Brexit can be unilaterally revoked are one step closer to getting a decision from the Court of Justice of the European Union. Yesterday the Inner House of the Co ...

21st March 2018 By

Internal relocation may not be “unduly harsh” on criminals

Last month the Court of Appeal considered the rules governing deportation of foreign criminals. The case is Secretary of State for the Home Department v SC (Jamaica) [2017] EWCA Civ 2112, which concerned a Jamaican national originally granted asylum ...

9th January 2018 By

Court of Appeal: visa conditions do not count unless notified in writing

Today’s decision in Anwar v Secretary of State for the Home Department [2017] EWCA Civ 2134 confirms that if the Home Office wishes to impose visa conditions, it must give people written notice of those conditions. If the Home Office fails ...

15th December 2017 By

The Home Office is entitled to ignore a judge’s decision to grant bail

The Court of Appeal has reluctantly agreed that the Home Office has the power to ignore a First-tier Tribunal’s decision to grant bail to an immigration detainee. However, on the particular facts of the case, the decision to refuse consent to bail w ...

24th November 2017 By