Briefing: sea rescue of refugees in UK law and proposals for change

In a previous briefing we saw that customary international law, four international conventions and international human rights law all impose a duty on states to rescue those in distress at sea and to set up and maintain search and rescue services. We also saw that the enforceability of international law is controversial. Put simply, if a state breaches an international law obligation, what happens next? International conventions do not have direct effect in the United Kingdom: they have to be implemented by domestic law for them to create enforceable obligations. It is indeed a criminal offence in UK law to fail to rescue a person in distress at sea in … Continue reading Briefing: sea rescue of refugees in UK law and proposals for change