All Articles: Cases

High Court upholds failing system of suicide reports in detention centres

The High Court has decided that rule 35(2) of the Detention Centre Rules is not unlawful, despite acknowledging the overwhelming evidence that it has failed to protect the welfare of detainees who are at risk of suicide. In R (IS (Bangladesh)) v Secre ...

18th October 2019 By

Refugees’ dependants can be sent packing if country of origin circumstances have changed

A grant of refugee status usually involves acceptance that a particular set of circumstances exist which would make it unlawful for a person to be returned to their country of origin. But circumstances change, and this can have a knock-on effect on wh ...

17th October 2019 By

Relatives of refugees are not legally refugees after all

The Court of Appeal has held that the UN Refugee Convention should not be interpreted to include an implied type of derivative refugee status for the family members of refugees. As a result, anyone who was granted refugee status under UK law as the fa ...

16th October 2019 By

Split human rights court suggests lower threshold for resisting removal on medical grounds

In Savran v Denmark (application no. 57467/15) the European Court of Human Rights has reinforced the importance, in Article 3 medical treatment cases, of the obligation on governments to obtain assurances where there is any doubt as to the impact of r ...

15th October 2019 By

Court of Appeal cheatsheet on human rights in immigration cases

In GM (Sri Lanka) v Secretary of State for the Home Department [2019] EWCA Civ 1630, handed down on Friday, the Court of Appeal provides a helpful summary of where we currently stand with private and family life cases under Article 8 of the European C ...

8th October 2019 By

CJEU: Child self-sufficient if supported by parent working without work permit

The Court of Justice of the European Union has found that a child is self-sufficient in EU law even if supported only by the earnings of a parent who is working without permission to do so. The case is C‑93/18 Bajratari. The case involved an Albania ...

2nd October 2019 By

Family courts have no power to prevent removal of children at risk of FGM abroad

The President of the Family Division has decided that the family courts have no jurisdiction to interfere with immigration control, even if they think it is necessary to protect a girl from female genital mutilation (FGM). The most they can do is to a ...

1st October 2019 By

Tribunal finds “centre of life” integration and intention tests irrelevant in Surinder Singh cases

The Upper Tribunal has finally, some six years after the test was introduced into domestic regulations, taken a good, hard look at the “centre of life” test applied by the Home Office to Surinder Singh cases. For background on the Surinder ...

20th September 2019 By

CJEU: expulsion of family members who lose right of residence must still comply with EU law

In the case of C‑94/18 Chenchooliah the Court of Justice of the European Union returns to the contentious issue of the rights of family members of EU citizens. Family members like to have rights, governments like to be able to remove family members ...

19th September 2019 By

Government can be liable for costs in Cart type judicial review cases

The Court of Appeal has held that the UK government can be asked to pay expenses where a judicial review has been brought against the Upper Tribunal’s refusal to grant permission to appeal. The test case of Faqiri v Upper Tribunal (Immigration and A ...

22nd August 2019 By

What happens when a deportation order is served on a 17-year-old EEA national detained in prison?

Regulation 33 of the Immigration (European Economic Area) Regulations 2016 (SI 2016/1052) does not wrongfully exclude the ordinary principles applicable in interim relief applications. It does not exclude them at all. So held Mr Justice Murray in R (Y ...

16th August 2019 By

Trafficking victim successfully overturns ten-year-old conviction

O v R [2019] EWCA Crim 1389 is the latest of a series of appeals brought by victims of trafficking against historic convictions. In this case the Court of Appeal (Criminal Division) decided to quash a 2008 conviction because the prosecution had not ev ...

14th August 2019 By

Student facing death penalty for ISIS membership stripped of British citizenship

A student who ran away to join ISIS in Syria has lost a legal challenge to the UK government’s decision to take away his British citizenship. The judgment, handed down yesterday and the first case of its kind in the High Court, is R (Islam) v Se ...

8th August 2019 By

Senior judges despair of “Byzantine” immigration laws

Always a worry (but never a surprise) when Court of Appeal judges start off a judgment by saying that the case “has a tortuous procedural history”, is “highly technical” and involves “Byzantine… provisions” of immigration law. Firdaws v ...

31st July 2019 By

Refugee status can be taken away even if threat of persecution still looms

In Secretary of State for the Home Department v MS (Somalia) [2019] EWCA Civ 1345, the Court of Appeal has held that the Home Office can cease refugee status where there has been a change of circumstances in the refugee’s country of origin such ...

30th July 2019 By

12 years a litigant: Franco Vomero case returns to Supreme Court

The Supreme Court handed down its second judgment in the long-running case of Franco Vomero today. The latest instalment is Secretary of State for the Home Department v Franco Vomero [2019] UKSC 35. The facts Mr Vomero is Italian. He moved to the UK a ...

24th July 2019 By

Win a deportation appeal? You can still be deported, Court of Appeal holds

If a foreign criminal wins their deportation appeal, can the Home Office try and deport them again, even where there has been no further offending? In MA (Pakistan) v Secretary of State for the Home Department [2019] EWCA Civ 1252, the Court of Appea ...

24th July 2019 By

Tribunal told to think again on exclusion from refugee status of Iraqi military doctor

The First-tier and Upper Tribunals seem to have gone rather badly wrong in the case of MAB (Iraq) v The Secretary of State for the Home Department [2019] EWCA Civ 1253, involving an Iraqi doctor who was formerly employed to care for prisoners by Iraqi ...

22nd July 2019 By

Home Office gets extra time to acknowledge service of judicial reviews

In immigration law, deadlines are important. They also frequently cause confusion. Sound familiar? That may be because this is how I began a post last month following the Upper Tribunal case of Bhavsar. The Upper Tribunal has now published another cas ...

19th July 2019 By

What does “unduly harsh” mean in deportation cases?

In the case of Secretary of State for the Home Department v PG (Jamaica) [2019] EWCA Civ 1213 the Court of Appeal considered the meaning of “unduly harsh” in deportation cases, overturning the decisions of both of the tribunals that had pr ...

17th July 2019 By

Tough approach on admitting new evidence before the Upper Tribunal

The Court of Appeal has taken a restrictive approach to the admission of new evidence before the Upper Tribunal that was not available before the First-tier Tribunal. The case is Kabir v Secretary of State for the Home Department [2019] EWCA Civ 1162. ...

16th July 2019 By

Court of Appeal demands individual proportionality assessments for EU citizens detained pending deportation

The Home Office cannot detain an EU citizen pending deportation without first considering whether detention is “proportionate and necessary” under EU law, the Court of Appeal has said in R (Lauzikas) v Secretary of State for the Home Depar ...

15th July 2019 By

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