Obituary: Ian Macdonald QC

Ian Macdonald QC has passed away. He was the founder and father of immigration law in this country. He literally wrote the book when in 1983 he published the first edition of the now legendary Macdonald’s Immigration Law & Practice. It is now i ...

13th November 2019 By

Book review: What do we know and what should we do about immigration? by Jonathan Portes

The unrelentingly, unremittingly reasonable advocate of evidence-based policy making Jonathan Portes has written an unrelentingly, unremittingly reasonable book about what the evidence tells us about immigration policy. Called What do we know and what ...

22nd October 2019 By

Immigration update podcast, episode 69

Welcome to episode 69 of the Free Movement immigration update podcast. This is a bumper Brexit issue: we’ll be covering the government’s policy on ending free movement for EU citizens, in addition to a healthy crop of cases on EU immigrati ...

21st October 2019 By

British by descent: when the child of a British citizen is not themselves British

A story hit the news over the weekend of two-year-old Lucy, the child of British parents who has been told by the Home Office that she must leave the UK. It is always difficult to comment on news stories without knowing the full facts but it is certai ...

15th October 2019 By

Immigration update podcast, episode 68

Welcome to episode 68 of the Free Movement immigration update podcast. We’re continuing our review of the summer, with developments to mention in areas as diverse as asylum, litigation costs, citizenship deprivation and human trafficking. WeR ...

10th October 2019 By

Book review: The Windrush Betrayal by Amelia Gentleman

Amelia Gentleman will be familiar to Free Movement readers as the Guardian journalist who exposed what has become known as the Windrush scandal. Her account of what happened, how the scandal developed and why the Windrush generation experienced the pr ...

3rd October 2019 By

CJEU: Child self-sufficient if supported by parent working without work permit

The Court of Justice of the European Union has found that a child is self-sufficient in EU law even if supported only by the earnings of a parent who is working without permission to do so. The case is C‑93/18 Bajratari. The case involved an Albania ...

2nd October 2019 By

Immigration update podcast, episode 67

Welcome to episode 67 of the Free Movement immigration update podcast. As you may have noticed, we’ve been on a rather extended holiday, so we’re going to use this and the next episode to catch you up on what’s gone on in immigration ...

27th September 2019 By

Appellant can remain in UK to pursue EEA appeal even if lodged abroad

That is, if the appellant can get back in. The case is Isufaj (PTA decisions/reasons; EEA reg. 37 appeals) [2019] UKUT 283 (IAC). There is no right of admission but if admitted the appeal can be pursued from within the UK. Why the case gets reported f ...

26th September 2019 By

Court of Justice finds that self-employed women have maternity rights

Yes, the Court of Justice of the European Union has had to find that self-employed EU citizens retain rights of residence during their maternity period. Why on earth the government of the United Kingdom tried to argue they did not is one of those myst ...

25th September 2019 By

Tribunal finds “centre of life” integration and intention tests irrelevant in Surinder Singh cases

The Upper Tribunal has finally, some six years after the test was introduced into domestic regulations, taken a good, hard look at the “centre of life” test applied by the Home Office to Surinder Singh cases. For background on the Surinder ...

20th September 2019 By

CJEU: expulsion of family members who lose right of residence must still comply with EU law

In the case of C‑94/18 Chenchooliah the Court of Justice of the European Union returns to the contentious issue of the rights of family members of EU citizens. Family members like to have rights, governments like to be able to remove family members ...

19th September 2019 By

Briefing: what is the ‘right of abode’ in UK immigration and nationality law?

As I was reviewing John Vassiliou’s excellent piece on Hong Kongers with British National Overseas status last week, I realised that we’ve never put together an explainer on the right of abode. A quick Google search showed up no great expl ...

18th September 2019 By

Return of two-year post study work visa announced

The two-year post study work visa has returned from the dead, apparently. Multiple statements, from the Prime Minister, the Business Secretary, the Department for Education and, last and least, the Home Office have been released announcing the resurre ...

11th September 2019 By

Free movement rules to continue after no deal Brexit

The Johnson ‘government’ has reaffirmed that free movement rules will continue if the UK leaves the EU without a deal on 31 October. A new voluntary (Ed. – !?!) immigration scheme will be introduced called the European Temporary Leav ...

9th September 2019 By

New book: Citizenship in Times of Turmoil? Theory, Practice and Policy

Here follows a shameless plug for a book to which I have contributed a chapter on deprivation and nullification of British citizenship. It is edited by the excellent Devyani Prabhat at the University of Bristol (do follow her on Twitter) and the vario ...

5th September 2019 By

MAC instructed to ponder points based immigration system

The long suffering Migration Advisory Committee, or ‘MAC’ to its friends, has been commissioned to carry out yet another review. Back in June 2019 the MAC were asked by one Home Secretary to think again about salary thresholds for skilled ...

5th September 2019 By

New guidance advises judges “doubt doesn’t mean it is arguable”

A new revised guidance note for judges has been published by some other judges: Joint Presidential Guidance 2019 No 1: Permission to appeal to UTIAC. Paragraph 31 seems wrong to me, or at least inexactly phrased: If a FtT judge considering an applicat ...

3rd September 2019 By

Briefing: How expensive are UK immigration applications and is this a problem?

The cost of making an immigration or nationality application has risen extremely steeply in recent years. Annual increases of 20% or 25% per year became standard, bringing the current cost of an application for indefinite leave to remain (aka settleme ...

3rd September 2019 By

Government rows back on bonkers plan to end free movement on 31 October

The Government yesterday rowed back on the bonkers idea floated by Home Secretary Priti Patel two weeks ago to end free movement of EU citizens into the UK on 31 October 2019. Apart from the obvious problem of having to invent and implement a new immi ...

2nd September 2019 By

What are the continuing professional development CPD training rules for immigration lawyers?

Since 2016 there has been no minimum CPD training hours requirement and training can be undertaken by any training provider or even by informal methods including self study. The rules for solicitors, barristers and OISC advisers are all broadly simila ...

22nd August 2019 By

Online immigration law CPD training for solicitors, barristers and OISC advisers

We’ve been busy working away at creating new CPD immigration training courses and updating our existing ones. Our courses are perfect for CPD for solicitors, barristers and OISC advisers and we now offer over 100 hours of CPD training to our 2,5 ...

15th August 2019 By

What is the no recourse to public funds condition?

The “no recourse to public funds” condition is imposed on grants of limited leave to enter or remain with the effect of prohibiting the person holding that leave from accessing certain defined public funds. A person who claims public funds despi ...

5th August 2019 By

Immigration update podcast, episode 66

Welcome to episode 66 of the Free Movement immigration update podcast. CJ has just been on a podcasting course and you may notice a few differences this month, including some intro music. This month we start in the Supreme Court with its decision on t ...

22nd July 2019 By

Tribunal told to think again on exclusion from refugee status of Iraqi military doctor

The First-tier and Upper Tribunals seem to have gone rather badly wrong in the case of MAB (Iraq) v The Secretary of State for the Home Department [2019] EWCA Civ 1253, involving an Iraqi doctor who was formerly employed to care for prisoners by Iraqi ...

22nd July 2019 By

Is “Tommy Robinson” entitled to refugee status and when is prosecution persecution?

Stephen Yaxley-Lennon, Paul Harris or Tommy Robinson or whatever he calls himself today, has directly appealed to President Donald Trump to be granted asylum and evacuated to safety in the United States in an interview with notorious website Infowars. ...

10th July 2019 By

Tribunal judge opines on wayward ways of other tribunal judges

The official headnote to Durueke (PTA: AZ applied, proper approach) [2019] UKUT 197 (IAC), which reads more like a memo to self or some sort of passive-aggressive intra-judge fisticuffs: (i) In reaching a decision whether to grant permission to appea ...

5th July 2019 By

New immigration bail training course out now

There are over 100 hours worth of immigration law training courses on Free Movement now, all accessible to paid members. The latest addition to the menu covers immigration bail. The core modules cover the practicalities of making a bail application to ...

4th July 2019 By

Extended family members denied an appeal can go ahead and lodge one

Banger (EEA: EFM – Right of Appeal) [2019] UKUT 194 (IAC) has finally reached the end of the road. This is the case that went up to the Court of Justice of the European Union on, essentially, two issues: Does the Surinder Singh route apply to du ...

24th June 2019 By

Half price on Free Movement membership for new members

This week, to celebrate the GREAT weather we’ve been having, we’re running a summer sale until 30 June 2019 on individual and small group (up to 10 users) annual memberships: half price for the first year for new members. To claim your discoun ...

24th June 2019 By

Briefing: What does “sufficiency of protection” mean in UK asylum law?

The inelegant phrase “a sufficiency of protection” originates in a now obscure series of tribunal determinations from the 1990s. It was eventually entrenched in law by the House of Lords case of Horvath [2001] AC 489, but the diverse judgm ...

20th June 2019 By

Asylos: free country information reports for asylum cases

“Country and expert evidence is indispensable in supporting an asylum seeker’s case. Asylos helps me – and immigration officials – better understand my client’s circumstances.” – Tori Sicher, Sutovic & Har ...

19th June 2019 By

Supreme Court finds UK breached residence rights of hundreds of thousands of EU citizens

The Supreme Court has today dismissed the Home Office appeal in the case of Gubeladze [2019] UKSC 31. The judgment affects hundreds of thousands of EU citizens from the so-called Accession Eight (or “A8”) countries that joined the EU in ...

19th June 2019 By

What is the legal definition of a “refugee”?

This week is Refugee Week. On Free Movement we try to communicate complex legal issues in immigration and asylum law in a clear way and here we answer the question “what is a refugee?” We’ll have a load of other refugee related conte ...

17th June 2019 By

Immigration update podcast, episode 65

Welcome to the May 2019 edition of the Free Movement immigration update podcast. This was a mercifully quiet month in immigration law, for a change, but there’s still a few decisions from the Court of Appeal to be aware of — particularly o ...

14th June 2019 By

Settled Status Handbook: updated second edition out now, free for members

We have launched an updated second edition of our Settled Status Handbook on applying to the EU Settlement Scheme. This is our guide for EU citizens and their family members applying for settled or pre-settled status to legally remain in the UK after ...

10th June 2019 By

Immigration tribunal starting to cancel appeal hearings where bundles served late

The immigration tribunal is piloting a new system of automatically “de-listing” (judge-speak for cancelling or adjourning) appeal hearings where an appellant serves their bundle late. I’ve run into the pilot at Newport, but responses ...

6th June 2019 By

Theresa May’s immigration legacy

Theresa May has just announced her resignation. She will leave office on 7 June 2019, leaving a legacy indelibly associated with two things: Brexit and immigration. The gridlock on the former being, infamously, a function of her obsession with the lat ...

24th May 2019 By

Immigration update podcast, episode 64

Welcome to the April 2019 edition of the Free Movement immigration update podcast. This month we start with a big Court of Appeal decision on “paragraph 322(5)” tax cases and the state of play on the new business visas. There’s just ...

20th May 2019 By

Refugees can lawfully be deprived of status under EU law

The Court of Justice of the European Union has decided in joined cases C‑391/16, C‑77/17 and C‑78/17 M, X and X that recognised refugees who commit serious crimes can be lawfully deprived of their refugee status under EU law and that there is no ...

17th May 2019 By
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