All Articles: CJEU

New CJEU case extends Zambrano rights of residence, emphasises best interests of children

In a new case, Chavez-Vilchez and Others v Netherlands C-133/15, the Court of Justice of the European Union has significantly extended Zambrano rights beyond those so far recognised by the Home Office and UK courts. The case offers far better guidanc ...

16th May 2017 By

Detention of Dublin asylum seekers held to be unlawful

Al Chodor and Others (C-528/15) In a highly significant judgment the CJEU has shown, in effect, that the Home Office has unlawfully detained hundreds or even thousands of individuals seeking international protection. The background facts The Al C ...

23rd March 2017 By

EU derived rights of residence not automatically lost if crime is committed

In two linked cases, CS v UK C-304/14 and Marin v Spain C-165/14, the Court of Justice of the European Union has ruled that Zambrano-like derived rights of residence under EU law are not automatically lost if a crime is committed. Instead, each case m ...

3rd October 2016 By

CJEU judgment on domestic violence victims: NA C-115/15

Last week the Court of Justice of the European Union gave judgment in the case of NA C-115/15 on the vexed issue of retained rights of residence for victims of domestic violence. It is hard to care given the result of the Brexit referendum but it is ...

6th July 2016 By

New CJEU ruling on procedural protection in legal challenges to EU law decisions

In an interesting but almost impenetrable judgment, the Court of Justice of the European Union gives some guidance on procedural protections available to those bringing challenges to EU law decisions which adversely affect them. The case is Benalla v ...

18th March 2016 By

EU right of residence where a marriage ends plus source of self sufficiency

The new case of Kuldip Singh Case C‑218/14 is important on two separate issues: when non EU citizens might retain rights of residence in the event of divorce and on the source of self sufficiency in EU law. EU free movement law does not only apply ...

4th August 2015 By

McCarthy and EU family permits

Last year the Court of Justice of the European Union handed down judgment in the case of McCarthy v United Kingdom C-202/13. In some ways it is a very straightforward case: the UK is not permitted to require residence card holding family members of E ...

29th January 2015 By

EU court bans credibility ‘tests’ for gay refugees

In welcome news for LGBT asylum claimants, the Court of Justice of the European Union ruled this week that ‘tests’ to prove a claimant’s sexual orientation, or intimate questioning about sexual behaviour, may breach the rights to human dignity ...

4th December 2014 By

Dano and the exclusion of inactive EU citizens from certain non-contributory social benefits

When the Grand Chamber handed down its judgment in Dano v Jobcenter Leipzig (C-333/13) on 11 November 2014, it was the subject of much media attention: Germany can deny benefits to jobless EU migrants, court rules (The Guardian), Landmark ECJ ruling ...

19th November 2014 By

From ABC to DSSH: How to prove that you are a gay refugee?

In an e-mail posting on a practitioners’ discussion group last week, a representative asked the group for details of a psychiatrist in order to prove that the detained client is gay. In follow-up e-mails, it was revealed that the enquiry was prompte ...

23rd July 2014 By

Woman who temporarily gives up work for childbirth still a worker

Court of Justice of the European Union in Saint Prix v UK (Case C‑507/12): Article 45 TFEU must be interpreted as meaning that a woman who gives up work, or seeking work, because of the physical constraints of the late stages of pregnancy and the af ...

20th June 2014 By

CJEU: Dependency is a question of fact

In a new judgment in the case of Reyes v Sweden [2014] EUECJ C-423/12 (BAILII link) the Court of Justice of the European Union has addressed the question of whether a dependent family member must be involuntarily dependent in order to qualify for fre ...

27th January 2014 By

It’s official: CJEU says prison doesn’t count

When an EU citizen breaks the law of another member state, fundamental questions arise. How should European states treat EU nationals and their family members who have committed crimes? How can the principles of free movement and integration, which ar ...

20th January 2014 By

After Zambrano and McCarthy, we now have Dereci…

On 15th November 2011, the Court of Justice of the European Union (‘the CJEU’) handed down its judgment in the case of Dereci (C-256/11).  This was a much awaited judgment after the ‘Zambrano and Article 20’ revolution was dampene ...

23rd January 2012 By

NS v UK: removals under the Dublin II regulation

In the case of NS v UK (C-411/10) (see here for FM’s earlier alerter post), the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) held that the transfer of an asylum-seeker from one EU Member State to another under the Dublin II regulation is no ...

11th January 2012 By